henryohlhoffhouse

Reminder: Henry Ohlhoff House Open House for Attorney Partners

The Henry Ohlhoff House is hosting an Open House for Attorney Partners on April 24th from 1-2pm. If you're in the legal industry, stop by to learn how our program may help your clients with DUI, possession, domestic violence, and other drug & alcohol related charges.

Please contact John Halverson, Program Director, at 415-621-4388 for more information.

The Henry Ohlhoff House is a long term residential addiction treatment program specifically designed for men to be able to maintain employment.

We are also always looking for trusted attorney to refer clients to.

Henry Ohlhoff House Open House for Attorney Partners

The Henry Ohlhoff House is hosting an Open House for Attorney Partners on April 24th from 1-2pm. If you're in the legal industry, stop by to learn how our program may help your clients with DUI, possession, domestic violence, and other drug & alcohol related charges.

Please contact John Halverson, Program Director, at 415-621-4388 or jhalverson@ohlhoff.org for more information.

The Henry Ohlhoff House is a long term residential addiction treatment program specifically designed for men to be able to maintain employment.

We are also always looking for trusted attorney to refer clients to.

Gerry S. and his Henry Ohlhoff House Graduation Yucca

Gerry S. and his Henry Ohlhoff House Graduation Yucca

"I entered the Henry Ohlhoff House in 1987. My total time upon graduation was about one and a half years in the House, which I badly needed.

Skip Byron was the Director and I was so lucky to be under his guidance. My group facilitator, Alice, kept us all in line. At my graduation after dinner Skip presented each of us with a small plant. Mine was a 4 inch Yucca plant. This baby Yucca traveled with me to Arizona, Tennessee, Florida, and back to California. The Yucca is now about 12 feet tall has grown 3 major trunks, much like the different branches of my life.

Everything in my life today is possible because of the love, understanding, and giving that I received at the Henry Ohlhoff House."

We also found a photo of current Skip Byron Primary Program Counselor, Mark Langton, receiving his graduation plant in 1986! We Wonder if he's been able to keep his plant alive all these years too.

The Philosophy of the Working Men’s Residential Program

Sixty years ago, the Henry Ohlhoff House was created as a house where men with addictions could live together, support each other, and work to put themselves on the path to a new life. Requiring men to work outside the House meant that men would leave the house every day, encounter the day-to-day demands of regular life, then come back to a safe home where they could talk about their successes and failures of the day. What these men find is that, over time, regular life without their drug of choice is not only possible, but satisfying and fun.

Today, the program has changed some. An evidenced-based clinical component of group work, psycho-education, and individual one-on-one counseling has been added to a client’s experience. Despite these changes, however, the underlying philosophy of men living together is the same. In 2019, we call this the Social Model, but in 1958 it was simply the creation of a sympathetic brotherhood.

The Social Model is the underlying ‘magic’ that impacts clients most. The act of living in a community, practicing new social and personal skills, and learning through experience helps clients acquire healthy habits to overwrite the old behaviors that facilitated their addiction. It is a model I have been privileged to see change lives.

The pace of life today is faster, with seemingly endless demands for one’s time. Thus, it is essential that we offer a 3-month working men’s residential program in order to accommodate for more individual constraints. If a person does not walk through our door for fear of committing to 6-months, we have no chance of helping him.

Regardless of the program, everyone participates in the culture of the House. Men in the three-month program have chores and responsibilities, are held accountable by their peers, and participate in House rules and traditions. Fully immersed in the Henry Ohlhoff House, men receive the same benefits (albeit for three fewer months) as those in the six-month program.

Still, the full six month program offers the greatest chance at a life of self-reliance free from substance use. Research has shown that the longer an individual is in treatment, the greater the chance of success in long-term recovery. Participants in the three-month program have the option to transition into the six-month program.

It is our hope that men with addictions that feel they cannot commit to the House for a full six-months, will see the three-month program as an opportunity to access the benefits of living in the Henry Ohlhoff House.

For more information contact John Halverson at 415-621-4388 or email jhalverson@ohlhoff.org. 

Working Men's Residential Program Now 3-Months or 6-Months

Ohlhoff's working men's residential program, the Henry Ohlhoff House, is now 3-6 months long! Men in this program work, attend school, or volunteer in the community while living in a safe, sober, supportive, and structured addiction treatment environment.

For more information visit ohlhoff.org/henry-ohlhoff-house or call 415-621-4388.

Reliving the Rancid Benefit Concert

We're currently reliving the awesomeness from Rancid’s benefit concert! Thank you again, Lars and Rancid​, for the incredible concert last month. It was an irreplaceable show of support for the men and women who begin their recovery from drug and alcohol addiction at Ohlhoff Recovery Programs.

Thank you for the photograph, Misti Layne Photography​.

New 3 Month Option for The Henry Ohlhoff House

Ohlhoff Recovery Program's working men's residential program, the Henry Ohlhoff House (HOH), has been saving lives and helping adult men with alcohol or drug dependency for 60 years. Historically a 6 to 12 month program, HOH is now a 3 to 6 month program!

The extended residential treatment design of the Henry Ohlhoff House allows men time to address the underlying causes of their addiction, search for employment, develop relationships with their sober peers, and learn to maneuver everyday stressors under therapeutic support.

For more information visit ohlhoff.org/henry-ohlhoff-house or call 415-621-4388.

Ohlhoff Recovery Programs Thanksgiving Dinner

We are looking forward to Ohlhoff's annual Thanksgiving Dinner next Tuesday, November 20th! Please join us at 6:00pm to celebrate and give thanks for recovery. All family and friends of Ohlhoff are welcome to attend.

If you are an Ohlhoff alumnus and would like to help serve dinner, please email Henry Ohlhoff House Program Director, John Halverson.

You can find the FaceBook event here.

August 31, 2018 - International Overdose Awareness Day

Ohlhoff's 6-Month Working Men’s Residential Program Director, John Halverson, reflects on why there is a negative stigma surrounding substance use related deaths:

“The stigma that often surrounds a substance related death is the same stigma that was (and to a large extent still is) applied to those with substance use disorders (SUD’s). The origin of the stigma is from a time when people with SUD’s were judged as being morally deficient and lacking will power. The terms used to describe these individuals were similarly judgmental, 'drunkard', 'lush', or 'junkie'. Any of these terms sound familiar? Does a negative persona come to mind?

Unfortunately, despite the advancements in SUD’s research, people with SUD’s still experience moral criticism. Experts understand that a SUD can be thought of as a Bio-Psycho-Social disorder and not a character flaw, but that view is not always shared by those less knowledgeable of SUD’s.

Due to the urgency of the current opioid crisis, we now see addiction in the press and openly discussed by public figures. It is encouraging that there is less of a 'just say no' approach to substance use and more of an acknowledgment that substance use disorders are a mental health condition that can be treated.”

Our thoughts, especially today, are always with everyone who has lost a friend, family member, neighbor, or patient to overdose.

We would also like to thank Facing Addiction with NCADD for mobilizing our community and successfully influencing a digital media company to change an upcoming documentary film title from ‘American Junkie’ to a less stigmatizing and more supportive title.

Opioid Addiction Finally Getting The National Attention It Deserves

"Like many of you reading this, I have been surprised by all the news headlines that have come out over the last few months about opioid addiction. For far too long it seemed as if the government and news media were ignoring the problem. Finally, on August 10th, the President declared a national health emergency over the opioid crisis..."

Read more on the addiction epidemic from Ohlhoff Psychiatrist, Dr. Lennart Moller

601 Steiner St., Residential Campus, Upgrades!

Skip Byron Primary Program's Little Yellow Classroom is complete! Groups for our 30-Day Intensive Program now take place is this space, instead of the Skip Byron living room, allowing a mental and physical separation between the grueling work of treatment and participants' living environment.

601 Steiner St., Residential Campus, Upgrades!

Thank you to the Dollar-A-Day Club for the funds to refurnish the smoking section of the campus with attractive, durable, and comfortable new patio furniture! This area is crucial for the socialization that creates a lasting sober support network.

Again, the men and women in our programs thank you.

Second Director of Henry Ohlhoff House's Memoir Received

Ohlhoff recently received the memoir of Henry Ohlhoff House's second Director (1958-1968), Rev. Kenneth Sandercock. In it he writes about ensuring the original 6-Month Working Men's Program maintained a safe and abstinence based program, "I [was] forced to realize that if any man, no matter what his position, took any drink he had to be sent away at once. Otherwise every other man in the house would think he also could break all the rules and get away with it.  I once found four men, who occupied one room, drinking and playing cards with the bottle on the table in plain sight.  They were all gone in half an hour and gradually some sort of order was established.  It was awkward at times as when the chef had to be fired at four p.m. with no dinner begun and some 30 - 40 men due to eat at 6.00.  But out he had to go regardless." Decades later and all our alumni can relate to these continued traditions that uphold the integrity of the Henry Ohlhoff House.

Thank you to Rev. Sandercock's grandson, Michael, for sharing the memoir with us!